Tuesday, May 7, 2013

I got a dog!

Remember a few weeks back when I told you about Buddy, my foster dog? Well...he failed. Buddy was a failure at being a foster dog. Which means that my husband and I decided to adopt him!

Now, you must think I'm crazy to get a dog right before residency. And you would be right. I am a little crazy (but aren't we all?).

Of course, Buddy will great me after my long days and love me unconditionally. He will look up at me and light up the "cuteness" part of my brain that is reserved for children and dogs. So between Pediatrics and Buddy, I should be getting my recommended daily value of cuteness.

But this dog is not about me. He is more for my husband. Buddy loves to go camping, hiking, and even mountain biking, which he will do with my husband when I'm working the weekends. He also is allowed to go to work with the hubby. And Buddy just loves working for a biotech startup.

So welcome to the family, Buddy! We love you!



Buddy smiling because we're adopting him!


7 comments:

  1. Hi I have some questions. Did you do any research during college? If so, did you get any publications? Is research necessary to get into med school? How long did you do research? Did you do clinical volunteering throughout college? Or just during the summer?

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  2. Katherine, I always thought I would go to med school, all throughout high school and partly through college. However, sometime in college, I began having doubts. Is this really for me? I looked at a few of my pre-med peers and could see the passion very evidently. I am interested in this field, however, I can't help but think that I am a phony and I am not in it for the right reasons. ..that I don't have enough of a passion to do it. I think the idea of it would be great and practicing would be wonderful, as I love to help others, but I am also fearful of the schooling process itself and residency. Coming from a large family of doctors, it was just thought that I would naturally follow suit. I thought the same. I'm sure you can relate, as I read your blog, mentioning your father is a physician. I've always wanted to be great at whatever I do, not just good. I want to push past my comfort zone and make novel discoveries in whatever career I choose. For some reason, I think that by choosing medicine I am settling. When I look at my peers, a lot of whom are SO excited at what they do, are passionate, and eagerly talking about their work, I can't help but think, that is what I want for the rest of my life, to be able to wake up knowing that I'm excited at what I'm doing. Now, I've come to the point, as a post-grad, where I have to make some decisions. Something that seemed like such a clear path earlier is now not so much. Any advice/insight/suggestions would be beyond appreciated.
    P.S. I'm an Asian. Lol. And I always wonder, how many Asians practice medicine for the pure enjoyment of it? Gah, it seems like so many just want to get into early acceptance programs...like, how do you know in high school that that is what you want to do?
    Anyways, thanks for reading. AND CONGRATS ON PEDS AT STANFORD!! Way to go, Katherine!!! :)))

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    1. There are SO many other fields out there where you can help people AND hopefully find something you are super passionate about! If you end up deciding medicine is for you, then great, but try to be open minded (I know it's hard, particularly if your whole family chose medicine). You can "help people" in so many different fields. And if you find you're not that passionate with medicine, it might be better to find another path. I can't imagine how painful the medical training process would be if I wasn't in love with the field:) Good luck!

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  3. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurologically-based condition, resulting from a lack of or imbalance in certain chemicals in the brain having to do with self-regulation. Children who actually have this chemical imbalance have difficulty in their ability to manage themselves in a number of ways. As a result, an ADHD child has a weak regulatory system, or what I call a weak governor. So, if parents truly understand that this is a biochemical conditions, why would they not want to balance out their child's chemicals? Why would parents want their child to struggle and suffer when the problem is neurologically-based and not within the child's total control? In my 25+ years of working with 100's and 100's of kids, the most effective way I have seen to treat a child who is truly and accurately diagnosed ADHD is to balance his chemicals. Since I am not a medical doctor, I cannot say that a child needs medicine. What I can recommend, however, is that a child be seen by a physician with expertise in ADHD and be evaluated for medication based on my clinical findings
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  4. He's adorable! Glad to hear he'll have a great owner

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